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INDIAN (H)

Remember the Fortis medical bill worth Rs 16 lakh? This law will ensure it never happens again

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The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.
The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.

In November last year, Fortis Memorial Research Institute (Gurgaon) charged the family of a seven-year-old dengue patient nearly Rs 16 lakh for 15 days in the ICU. The girl died while being shifted from Fortis to Rockland Hospital.

Hospitals in big cities inflate costs of medicine, etc., sometimes 100s of times. According to Satyendar Jain, the health minister of the Delhi state, there have been instances in the past in which private hospitals were found to have charged 1,000% to 1,700% margins on medicines and consumables.

Patients and their relatives will not have to deal with such inflated medical bills in Delhi, if a Bill being prepared by the Delhi government becomes law.

The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback. After 30 days, the government would make amendments to the Delhi Nursing Homes Registration Act to make the draft policy changes legally binding, state health minister Satyendar Jain told TOI.

Following are the highlights of the draft:

1. Prescription of NLEM medicine
As per the policy draft, private hospitals and nursing homes will have to preferably prescribe from the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM), the prices of which are regulated by the central government. For non-NLEM drugs and even disposables, we have decided that hospitals can charge a maximum 50% as mark-up against administrative/handling charges over and above its procurement or maximum retail price (MRP), whichever is lesser.

2. Fixed mark-up on implants
In the case of implants, too, many consumer groups and patients have been raising the issue of over-pricing and profiteering by private hospitals. The draft policy has fixed a mark-up of not more than 35% above the procurement price for that.

3. Fixed price for various procedures
The draft policy suggests fixed pricing for packages for various procedures. Also, it suggests that any additional procedure performed on the patient who has opted for a particular package will be charged at 50% of its original rate and that patients should be offered the choice of opting for a high-risk package that covers all possible complications and that it should not cost more than 20% higher.

The Economic Survey 2015-16, prepared by Chief Economic Advisor Arvind Subramanian and tabled in Parliament in February 2016, had pointed out large gap between the cost of government and private healthcare. “NSSO (2015) reports that the average medical expenditure for treatment (excluding child birth) per hospitalized case if treated in private hospital was about four times than that of public hospital during January-June 2014. On an average, Rs 25,850 was spent for treatment per hospitalized case by people in the private facilities as against Rs 6,120 in the public health facilities,” said the survey.

Not just this. The next year Subramanian wrote in the Economic Survey that government should take action, including imposing fines, against hospitals for inflated costs. “There has to be concerted efforts by the Central and State governments to reform the health sector, by addressing quality issues, standardising rates for diagnostic tests, generating awareness about alternative health systems and introduction of punitive measures like fines on hospitals and private health providers for false claims through surgery, medicines, etc.,” he wrote.



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INDIAN (H)

Remember the Fortis medical bill worth Rs 16 lakh? This law will ensure it never happens again

no thumb


The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.
The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.

In November last year, Fortis Memorial Research Institute (Gurgaon) charged the family of a seven-year-old dengue patient nearly Rs 16 lakh for 15 days in the ICU. The girl died while being shifted from Fortis to Rockland Hospital.

Hospitals in big cities inflate costs of medicine, etc., sometimes 100s of times. According to Satyendar Jain, the health minister of the Delhi state, there have been instances in the past in which private hospitals were found to have charged 1,000% to 1,700% margins on medicines and consumables.

Patients and their relatives will not have to deal with such inflated medical bills in Delhi, if a Bill being prepared by the Delhi government becomes law.

The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback. After 30 days, the government would make amendments to the Delhi Nursing Homes Registration Act to make the draft policy changes legally binding, state health minister Satyendar Jain told TOI.

Following are the highlights of the draft:

1. Prescription of NLEM medicine
As per the policy draft, private hospitals and nursing homes will have to preferably prescribe from the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM), the prices of which are regulated by the central government. For non-NLEM drugs and even disposables, we have decided that hospitals can charge a maximum 50% as mark-up against administrative/handling charges over and above its procurement or maximum retail price (MRP), whichever is lesser.

2. Fixed mark-up on implants
In the case of implants, too, many consumer groups and patients have been raising the issue of over-pricing and profiteering by private hospitals. The draft policy has fixed a mark-up of not more than 35% above the procurement price for that.

3. Fixed price for various procedures
The draft policy suggests fixed pricing for packages for various procedures. Also, it suggests that any additional procedure performed on the patient who has opted for a particular package will be charged at 50% of its original rate and that patients should be offered the choice of opting for a high-risk package that covers all possible complications and that it should not cost more than 20% higher.

The Economic Survey 2015-16, prepared by Chief Economic Advisor Arvind Subramanian and tabled in Parliament in February 2016, had pointed out large gap between the cost of government and private healthcare. “NSSO (2015) reports that the average medical expenditure for treatment (excluding child birth) per hospitalized case if treated in private hospital was about four times than that of public hospital during January-June 2014. On an average, Rs 25,850 was spent for treatment per hospitalized case by people in the private facilities as against Rs 6,120 in the public health facilities,” said the survey.

Not just this. The next year Subramanian wrote in the Economic Survey that government should take action, including imposing fines, against hospitals for inflated costs. “There has to be concerted efforts by the Central and State governments to reform the health sector, by addressing quality issues, standardising rates for diagnostic tests, generating awareness about alternative health systems and introduction of punitive measures like fines on hospitals and private health providers for false claims through surgery, medicines, etc.,” he wrote.



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INDIAN (H)

Remember the Fortis medical bill worth Rs 16 lakh? This law will ensure it never happens again

no thumb


The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.
The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.

In November last year, Fortis Memorial Research Institute (Gurgaon) charged the family of a seven-year-old dengue patient nearly Rs 16 lakh for 15 days in the ICU. The girl died while being shifted from Fortis to Rockland Hospital.

Hospitals in big cities inflate costs of medicine, etc., sometimes 100s of times. According to Satyendar Jain, the health minister of the Delhi state, there have been instances in the past in which private hospitals were found to have charged 1,000% to 1,700% margins on medicines and consumables.

Patients and their relatives will not have to deal with such inflated medical bills in Delhi, if a Bill being prepared by the Delhi government becomes law.

The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback. After 30 days, the government would make amendments to the Delhi Nursing Homes Registration Act to make the draft policy changes legally binding, state health minister Satyendar Jain told TOI.

Following are the highlights of the draft:

1. Prescription of NLEM medicine
As per the policy draft, private hospitals and nursing homes will have to preferably prescribe from the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM), the prices of which are regulated by the central government. For non-NLEM drugs and even disposables, we have decided that hospitals can charge a maximum 50% as mark-up against administrative/handling charges over and above its procurement or maximum retail price (MRP), whichever is lesser.

2. Fixed mark-up on implants
In the case of implants, too, many consumer groups and patients have been raising the issue of over-pricing and profiteering by private hospitals. The draft policy has fixed a mark-up of not more than 35% above the procurement price for that.

3. Fixed price for various procedures
The draft policy suggests fixed pricing for packages for various procedures. Also, it suggests that any additional procedure performed on the patient who has opted for a particular package will be charged at 50% of its original rate and that patients should be offered the choice of opting for a high-risk package that covers all possible complications and that it should not cost more than 20% higher.

The Economic Survey 2015-16, prepared by Chief Economic Advisor Arvind Subramanian and tabled in Parliament in February 2016, had pointed out large gap between the cost of government and private healthcare. “NSSO (2015) reports that the average medical expenditure for treatment (excluding child birth) per hospitalized case if treated in private hospital was about four times than that of public hospital during January-June 2014. On an average, Rs 25,850 was spent for treatment per hospitalized case by people in the private facilities as against Rs 6,120 in the public health facilities,” said the survey.

Not just this. The next year Subramanian wrote in the Economic Survey that government should take action, including imposing fines, against hospitals for inflated costs. “There has to be concerted efforts by the Central and State governments to reform the health sector, by addressing quality issues, standardising rates for diagnostic tests, generating awareness about alternative health systems and introduction of punitive measures like fines on hospitals and private health providers for false claims through surgery, medicines, etc.,” he wrote.



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INDIAN (H)

Remember the Fortis medical bill worth Rs 16 lakh? This law will ensure it never happens again

no thumb


The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.
The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.

In November last year, Fortis Memorial Research Institute (Gurgaon) charged the family of a seven-year-old dengue patient nearly Rs 16 lakh for 15 days in the ICU. The girl died while being shifted from Fortis to Rockland Hospital.

Hospitals in big cities inflate costs of medicine, etc., sometimes 100s of times. According to Satyendar Jain, the health minister of the Delhi state, there have been instances in the past in which private hospitals were found to have charged 1,000% to 1,700% margins on medicines and consumables.

Patients and their relatives will not have to deal with such inflated medical bills in Delhi, if a Bill being prepared by the Delhi government becomes law.

The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback. After 30 days, the government would make amendments to the Delhi Nursing Homes Registration Act to make the draft policy changes legally binding, state health minister Satyendar Jain told TOI.

Following are the highlights of the draft:

1. Prescription of NLEM medicine
As per the policy draft, private hospitals and nursing homes will have to preferably prescribe from the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM), the prices of which are regulated by the central government. For non-NLEM drugs and even disposables, we have decided that hospitals can charge a maximum 50% as mark-up against administrative/handling charges over and above its procurement or maximum retail price (MRP), whichever is lesser.

2. Fixed mark-up on implants
In the case of implants, too, many consumer groups and patients have been raising the issue of over-pricing and profiteering by private hospitals. The draft policy has fixed a mark-up of not more than 35% above the procurement price for that.

3. Fixed price for various procedures
The draft policy suggests fixed pricing for packages for various procedures. Also, it suggests that any additional procedure performed on the patient who has opted for a particular package will be charged at 50% of its original rate and that patients should be offered the choice of opting for a high-risk package that covers all possible complications and that it should not cost more than 20% higher.

The Economic Survey 2015-16, prepared by Chief Economic Advisor Arvind Subramanian and tabled in Parliament in February 2016, had pointed out large gap between the cost of government and private healthcare. “NSSO (2015) reports that the average medical expenditure for treatment (excluding child birth) per hospitalized case if treated in private hospital was about four times than that of public hospital during January-June 2014. On an average, Rs 25,850 was spent for treatment per hospitalized case by people in the private facilities as against Rs 6,120 in the public health facilities,” said the survey.

Not just this. The next year Subramanian wrote in the Economic Survey that government should take action, including imposing fines, against hospitals for inflated costs. “There has to be concerted efforts by the Central and State governments to reform the health sector, by addressing quality issues, standardising rates for diagnostic tests, generating awareness about alternative health systems and introduction of punitive measures like fines on hospitals and private health providers for false claims through surgery, medicines, etc.,” he wrote.



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INDIAN (H)

Remember the Fortis medical bill worth Rs 16 lakh? This law will ensure it never happens again

no thumb


The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.
The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.

In November last year, Fortis Memorial Research Institute (Gurgaon) charged the family of a seven-year-old dengue patient nearly Rs 16 lakh for 15 days in the ICU. The girl died while being shifted from Fortis to Rockland Hospital.

Hospitals in big cities inflate costs of medicine, etc., sometimes 100s of times. According to Satyendar Jain, the health minister of the Delhi state, there have been instances in the past in which private hospitals were found to have charged 1,000% to 1,700% margins on medicines and consumables.

Patients and their relatives will not have to deal with such inflated medical bills in Delhi, if a Bill being prepared by the Delhi government becomes law.

The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback. After 30 days, the government would make amendments to the Delhi Nursing Homes Registration Act to make the draft policy changes legally binding, state health minister Satyendar Jain told TOI.

Following are the highlights of the draft:

1. Prescription of NLEM medicine
As per the policy draft, private hospitals and nursing homes will have to preferably prescribe from the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM), the prices of which are regulated by the central government. For non-NLEM drugs and even disposables, we have decided that hospitals can charge a maximum 50% as mark-up against administrative/handling charges over and above its procurement or maximum retail price (MRP), whichever is lesser.

2. Fixed mark-up on implants
In the case of implants, too, many consumer groups and patients have been raising the issue of over-pricing and profiteering by private hospitals. The draft policy has fixed a mark-up of not more than 35% above the procurement price for that.

3. Fixed price for various procedures
The draft policy suggests fixed pricing for packages for various procedures. Also, it suggests that any additional procedure performed on the patient who has opted for a particular package will be charged at 50% of its original rate and that patients should be offered the choice of opting for a high-risk package that covers all possible complications and that it should not cost more than 20% higher.

The Economic Survey 2015-16, prepared by Chief Economic Advisor Arvind Subramanian and tabled in Parliament in February 2016, had pointed out large gap between the cost of government and private healthcare. “NSSO (2015) reports that the average medical expenditure for treatment (excluding child birth) per hospitalized case if treated in private hospital was about four times than that of public hospital during January-June 2014. On an average, Rs 25,850 was spent for treatment per hospitalized case by people in the private facilities as against Rs 6,120 in the public health facilities,” said the survey.

Not just this. The next year Subramanian wrote in the Economic Survey that government should take action, including imposing fines, against hospitals for inflated costs. “There has to be concerted efforts by the Central and State governments to reform the health sector, by addressing quality issues, standardising rates for diagnostic tests, generating awareness about alternative health systems and introduction of punitive measures like fines on hospitals and private health providers for false claims through surgery, medicines, etc.,” he wrote.



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INDIAN (H)

Remember the Fortis medical bill worth Rs 16 lakh? This law will ensure it never happens again

no thumb


The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.
The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.

In November last year, Fortis Memorial Research Institute (Gurgaon) charged the family of a seven-year-old dengue patient nearly Rs 16 lakh for 15 days in the ICU. The girl died while being shifted from Fortis to Rockland Hospital.

Hospitals in big cities inflate costs of medicine, etc., sometimes 100s of times. According to Satyendar Jain, the health minister of the Delhi state, there have been instances in the past in which private hospitals were found to have charged 1,000% to 1,700% margins on medicines and consumables.

Patients and their relatives will not have to deal with such inflated medical bills in Delhi, if a Bill being prepared by the Delhi government becomes law.

The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback. After 30 days, the government would make amendments to the Delhi Nursing Homes Registration Act to make the draft policy changes legally binding, state health minister Satyendar Jain told TOI.

Following are the highlights of the draft:

1. Prescription of NLEM medicine
As per the policy draft, private hospitals and nursing homes will have to preferably prescribe from the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM), the prices of which are regulated by the central government. For non-NLEM drugs and even disposables, we have decided that hospitals can charge a maximum 50% as mark-up against administrative/handling charges over and above its procurement or maximum retail price (MRP), whichever is lesser.

2. Fixed mark-up on implants
In the case of implants, too, many consumer groups and patients have been raising the issue of over-pricing and profiteering by private hospitals. The draft policy has fixed a mark-up of not more than 35% above the procurement price for that.

3. Fixed price for various procedures
The draft policy suggests fixed pricing for packages for various procedures. Also, it suggests that any additional procedure performed on the patient who has opted for a particular package will be charged at 50% of its original rate and that patients should be offered the choice of opting for a high-risk package that covers all possible complications and that it should not cost more than 20% higher.

The Economic Survey 2015-16, prepared by Chief Economic Advisor Arvind Subramanian and tabled in Parliament in February 2016, had pointed out large gap between the cost of government and private healthcare. “NSSO (2015) reports that the average medical expenditure for treatment (excluding child birth) per hospitalized case if treated in private hospital was about four times than that of public hospital during January-June 2014. On an average, Rs 25,850 was spent for treatment per hospitalized case by people in the private facilities as against Rs 6,120 in the public health facilities,” said the survey.

Not just this. The next year Subramanian wrote in the Economic Survey that government should take action, including imposing fines, against hospitals for inflated costs. “There has to be concerted efforts by the Central and State governments to reform the health sector, by addressing quality issues, standardising rates for diagnostic tests, generating awareness about alternative health systems and introduction of punitive measures like fines on hospitals and private health providers for false claims through surgery, medicines, etc.,” he wrote.



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INDIAN (H)

Fortis Healthcare starts fresh bidding process

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The Fortis board has decided to initiate a fresh bid after the earlier investment offer did not appeal to the shareholders.
The Fortis board has decided to initiate a fresh bid after the earlier investment offer did not appeal to the shareholders.

Fortis Healthcare Ltd on Tuesday decided to initiate a fresh bidding process, after the board’s previous choice of the investment offer in the bidding war did not appeal to shareholders.

Three bidders – a consortium of Hero Enterprise Investment Office and the Burman Family Office, a consortium of TPG and Manipal Health Enterprises, and Malaysia’s IHH Healthcare Bhd – have been invited to participate in the process.

The invited bidders, should submit their interest by May 31, Fortis said on Tuesday. It also invited other parties to submit their expression of interest.



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Govt. panel gives clean chit to Adani-run hospital

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Govt. panel gives clean chit to Adani-run hospital

Bhuj (Gujarat): The Gujarat government appointed three-member panel investigating the death of newborns at the Gujarat Institute of Medical Sciences (GAIMS) Hospital in Bhuj gave a clean chit to the hospital authorities on Tuesday.

According to the report the treatment administered by the hospital were as per laid down ‘protocol and guidelines’.

The panel comprising Dr. Bhadresh Vyas and Dr. Himanshu Joshi, both heads of paediatrics from Jamnagar and Gandhinagar, respectively, and Dr. Kamal Goswami, additional professor with the department of gynaecology at Rajkot, observed that a large section of these patients were admitted with fatal complications such as neo-natal sepsis, birth asphyxia and congenital malformations.

A significant number of these cases were referred to GAIMS from other hospitals, it added. The panel report also recommended improvement of training for the hospital staff.

Dr. Gyaneshwar Rao, Medical Director, GAIMS, said “We are satisfied that the panel report reiterates our stand. We will continue to work with the government to attract and retain qualified specialist doctors in this facility. Our larger aim is to provide quality health care to the people of Kutch in rural Gujarat.”

The high mortality rate in the region is linked to the massive geography of the Kutch district, the largest district in India. Patients who come for critical care are forced to travel large distance to reach the hospital. Often severely critical patients referred to the hospital develop complications on the way, before admission.

According to public health experts the Newborn Mortality Rate in any given hospital is highly variable depending on the number of complicated patients admitted in them. If a hospital is getting very complicated cases its mortality rate will be higher. Generally, 10 to 20% mortality is accepted under such circumstances, he added.



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Remember the Fortis medical bill worth Rs 16 lakh? This law will ensure it never happens again

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The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.
The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.

In November last year, Fortis Memorial Research Institute (Gurgaon) charged the family of a seven-year-old dengue patient nearly Rs 16 lakh for 15 days in the ICU. The girl died while being shifted from Fortis to Rockland Hospital.

Hospitals in big cities inflate costs of medicine, etc., sometimes 100s of times. According to Satyendar Jain, the health minister of the Delhi state, there have been instances in the past in which private hospitals were found to have charged 1,000% to 1,700% margins on medicines and consumables.

Patients and their relatives will not have to deal with such inflated medical bills in Delhi, if a Bill being prepared by the Delhi government becomes law.

The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback. After 30 days, the government would make amendments to the Delhi Nursing Homes Registration Act to make the draft policy changes legally binding, state health minister Satyendar Jain told TOI.

Following are the highlights of the draft:

1. Prescription of NLEM medicine
As per the policy draft, private hospitals and nursing homes will have to preferably prescribe from the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM), the prices of which are regulated by the central government. For non-NLEM drugs and even disposables, we have decided that hospitals can charge a maximum 50% as mark-up against administrative/handling charges over and above its procurement or maximum retail price (MRP), whichever is lesser.

2. Fixed mark-up on implants
In the case of implants, too, many consumer groups and patients have been raising the issue of over-pricing and profiteering by private hospitals. The draft policy has fixed a mark-up of not more than 35% above the procurement price for that.

3. Fixed price for various procedures
The draft policy suggests fixed pricing for packages for various procedures. Also, it suggests that any additional procedure performed on the patient who has opted for a particular package will be charged at 50% of its original rate and that patients should be offered the choice of opting for a high-risk package that covers all possible complications and that it should not cost more than 20% higher.

The Economic Survey 2015-16, prepared by Chief Economic Advisor Arvind Subramanian and tabled in Parliament in February 2016, had pointed out large gap between the cost of government and private healthcare. “NSSO (2015) reports that the average medical expenditure for treatment (excluding child birth) per hospitalized case if treated in private hospital was about four times than that of public hospital during January-June 2014. On an average, Rs 25,850 was spent for treatment per hospitalized case by people in the private facilities as against Rs 6,120 in the public health facilities,” said the survey.

Not just this. The next year Subramanian wrote in the Economic Survey that government should take action, including imposing fines, against hospitals for inflated costs. “There has to be concerted efforts by the Central and State governments to reform the health sector, by addressing quality issues, standardising rates for diagnostic tests, generating awareness about alternative health systems and introduction of punitive measures like fines on hospitals and private health providers for false claims through surgery, medicines, etc.,” he wrote.



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INDIAN (H)

Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment proposes to include Multiple Sclerosis in Ayushman Bharat

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Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment proposes to include Multiple Sclerosis in Ayushman Bharat New Delhi 29 th May 2018: Multiple Sclerosis Society of India (MSSI) commemorated ‘World Multiple Sclerosis Day’ in the Capital; on this occasion MSSI brought Experts in the field, Government Officials and MS patients on a single platform. MSSI is the oldest society
in India dedicated to help people affected by multiple sclerosis effectively manage and cope with the disease. Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease in which body’s immune system starts damaging the protective layer of the nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord.

Through this conference MSSI tried to throw light on the actual picture of MS prevalence in India and this could serve as harbinger for upcoming research and at the same time it would definitely aid in working out future strategies for MS management in the country. There has been a considerable shift in MS prevalence in India and this has really changed the notion of considering India as a low risk zone for MS. In India, remarkable upsurge is needed in carrying out large scale population-based epidemiological studies to get an idea about the true incidence and prevalence rates of MS viz a viz disease burden.

Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. In India MS is targeting children’s as well starting from the age of 16 years. As per the last study conducted in India was 2003-04 there were 200,000 reported patients were affected with MS. Post that no study was conducted/done on this and it is believed that this figure must have gone up by 2 to 4 folds which could be 10 percent of world’s total Multiple Sclerosis patients.

Present on the occasion Mr. K. Vikram Simha Rao (Director, Department of Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities, Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment, Government of India) said, “There is a dire need of representation of disable people at the government level so that more disabilities can be included in the disability act and more schemes can be introduced &benefits can be passed on to the disable people. Government is planning to introduce a centralize data management system which would help in keeping a track on the population of disable people, type of disability and work effectively to provide facilities to the beneficiaries and the authorities will be able to access this centralize data from anywhere.”

Mr. Rao also informed that “Department of Empowerment of Persons with Disabilities has extended its proposal of including Multiple Sclerosis along with 20 other disabilities in the Ayushman Bharat – a National Health Protection Scheme (NHPS) so that MS patient can avail the central government’s health scheme, this would help a MS patient to be self-reliant to an extent.”

Dr. Kameshwar Prasad (Head of the Department of Neurology at AIIMS), said “A lot of research needs to be done on MS, earlier when MRI was not there it was hard to detect MS and used to be considered as the rare disease but post MRI it helps the doctor to diagnose the MS patient more effectively. MS patient and his family needs to be psychologically strong because MS also affects the patient’s mind, will-power, employment
and it disturbs his family and friends as well. It’s high time that organizations like MSSI, private institutions and government should come together to research so that the preventive measure can be taken and collaboratively work towards providing affordable MS generic drugs to the patient.”

Mr. T.D. Dhariyal (Commissioner for Persons with Disabilities, Govt. of NCT of Delhi), said “In these years we have noticed that the most common problem that a disable person faces is the ease of accessibility. A lot of awareness need to be created for MS and the organizations like MSSI should come forward and lead the awareness creating campaign.



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