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INDIAN (H)

INDIAN (H)

6 Common Winter Illnesses

Sore-throat.jpg


For most people, winter is that time of the year when a stuffy nose and a nagging cough become their constant companion. The cold and dry weather makes it difficult for your immune system to functional optimally, thus making you susceptible to a host of health ailments including the unfriendly neighbourhood common cold.

To keep your immune system in full throttle during the winter, you can steps like eating healthy, wearing warm clothes and exercising regularly. Being aware of various common winter illnesses is another measure that will serve you well during the cold months.

To make your search easier, we have compiled a list of the six most common winter illnesses –

  1. A Sore Throat

Sore throat

Extremely common during the colder months, a sore throat is usually caused by viral infections. New research has linked sore throat to the change in body temperature that takes place when you move from the comfort of your warm house to the cold outdoors. In addition to the usual symptoms, you may also experience swollen lymph nodes, headaches and high fever. Keep warm saline water handy to ease the symptoms. Other measures in managing a sore throat include drinking hot teas, soups, etc. Some people feel relief with lozenges, readily available in any pharmacy store.

  1. Asthma

Patient with asthma

As you know, the onset of winter is accompanied by chilly air. For a patient of asthma, this can lead to increased bouts of wheezing. The patient may also experience breathing difficulties. For such people, it is recommended to avoid the outdoors during cold, windy days. Keep inhalers close by and cover the nose with a scarf when outdoors.

  1. Joint Pain

If you are a patient of arthritis, then this is a period when you have to stay very careful about your joint health. A large number of people with bone related disorders like arthritis have reported experiencing ‘more than the usual’ pain during the cold season. Medical experts have not yet ascertained the exact reason behind this. Ofcourse, you can manage the condition better by availing the services of a physiotherapist as he/she can help you better manage the symptoms of joint pain through simple exercises and massages.

  1.   Dry Skin

Chapped lips and flaky skin are two of the most common skin problems people experience during the colder months. Low humidity levels combined with cold winds form the perfect environment for your skin to dry up. Excessively chapped lips can also cause you to bleed from the cracks of your skin. To prevent this, opt for moisturizers which protect your skin from drying up by trapping the moisture in the skin. Also, avoid using hot water for bathing as that can further aggravate symptoms of dry skin.

  1. Flu 

flu shot
When it comes to flu, there is a saying that it can strike anyone, anytime. The most common symptoms include cough, muscle aches, chills and fever. Extremely contagious, implying you can never let your guard down. Getting a flu shot is one of the best ways to immunize yourself this winter. The elderly can also opt for the pneumococcal vaccine to protect themselves from pneumonia.

  1. Bronchitis

BronchitisBronchitis leads to inflammation in your bronchioles. Bronchioles are small passageways in the lungs which help you breathe. In addition to breathing difficulties, bronchitis also results in sore throat, nasal blockages, fever and dehydration. The symptoms are similar to that of the common cold, but unlike the latter, they persist for a longer duration. Severe cases of bronchitis may require hospitalization.

Inspite of all precautions, if you find yourself falling ill this winter, consider consulting a doctor. Also, if you are already ill, going out in the cold weather may further add to your discomfort. It is, therefore, advisable to avail doctor consultation at home: the place where you are most comfortable at with the added advantage of being surrounded with your loved ones.


6 Common Winter Illnesses was first posted on December 4, 2017 at 5:06 pm.
©2017 "Portea Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at chandana.das@porteamedical.com



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INDIAN (H)

Home Care Nursing in Winter

Nuse-with-old-woman.jpg


Winter season often turns out to be a testing time for people with health ailments, especially respiratory disorders and arthritis. Studies also indicate that the probability of a heart attack is more in winter. The chilly conditions can have an adverse impact on wound healing and it is often reported that post surgical rehab takes relatively longer time in winter.

The following article takes a look at how Home Care Nursing can be a boon in winter by taking a look at the disease condition and the best care that can be taken for the condition

Nurse with old woman

Rheumatoid Arthritis – tends to get worse during winter. The pain becomes acute during the cold weather and is further intensified if the moisture content in the air is high. This disrupts the blood circulation and causes a lot of pain. Rheumatoid arthritis thus requires more attention during the winter and having a nurse attend to your needs will ensure proper care.

How can a nurse help –

  • In severe cases, rheumatoid arthritis could affect your mobility. With the cold weather worsening the symptoms, it might become difficult for you to carry out routine activities like taking a trip to the washroom, wearing your clothes or even eating your food. A nursing attendant could help you out with these activities and make your day to day life easier.
  • Applying heat to the affected areas could provide a lot of relief to the pain and discomfort. A nurse can help with the application of hot compress to the affected area in an effective manner.

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) – This respiratory disorder tends to aggravate during the winter season. During this season, the severity of coughing and the amount of phlegm produced in the body goes up. Air pollution levels too surge during the colder months, making it difficult for those already suffering from breathing problems. Chances of medical emergencies related to the condition, including heart failure, pneumonia and pulmonary embolism are higher during the winters compared to other months. It is thus advisable to have a trained nurse by your side during these months.

How can a nurse help –

  • Different medications like beta-agonists that work as bronchodilators, anticholinergics which help to reduce bronchospasm and corticosteroids that contribute as an anti-inflammatory agents, can be monitored by the nurses at your home in case you have trouble breathing.
  • The oxygen level in your blood can become low if you suffer from COPD, as the lungs do not function to their optimum capacity. A nurse can monitor your oxygen level and if needed, put you on oxygen therapy. The process of assessing the level of oxygen and then bringing it back to normal through oxygen therapy, could become difficult for your family members to execute.
  • COPD puts a lot of stress on the heart. It is extremely important to keep an eye on the functioning of the heart if a person with this condition starts experiencing breathlessness. An ECG (echocardiography) can be conducted at home these days with devices that are portable and easy to use. Nurses are trained to use these portable ECG machines and call for help if required.
  • Moderate attacks could require you to undergo nebulization. Since the accuracy of the process determines its efficacy, it is best to go for professional help instead to doing the process on your own. If the mask of the nebuliser is not worn properly and the gas escapes from the gap between the mask and your cheek, or, if the vial containing the medicine is not attached to the device properly, then you would not get the desired result. This is why it is best to have a professional nurse supervise the process till you master it.

Pneumonia – is a lung infection that tends to aggravate in winter, especially in kids, the aged and those suffering from diseases that affect the immune system.  Symptoms like chest pain when a person breathes or coughs, reduced mental awareness in adults, fever with sweating and chills could become more severe and even lead to death. This happens because people prefer staying indoors during this season and become easily susceptible to contagious diseases, including flu. Also, reduced exposure to sunlight (best source of vitamin D) leads to a fall in your immunity levels and increases chances of contracting pneumonia.

How can a nurse help –

  • People suffering from pneumonia could have a blocked airway due to an infection or accumulation of mucus. There are different techniques and manoeuvres that can be done to provide relief from these symptoms. Nurses are taught to use specific devices to expel the mucus and phlegm, and perform the necessary techniques to give quick relief.
  • Nurses could also help you undergo chest physiotherapy. Undergoing this can help you cope with your condition in a more effective manner.
  • Collect sputum samples for testing at regular intervals.
  • It is important to keep an eye on your ABG (Arterial Blood Gasses) level especially if you have less oxygen reaching your tissues (hypoxia).

Receiving nursing care at home is a great stress reliever, and infact reduces your recovery time. Get in touch with a quality home care service provider to take care of your nursing needs this winter.

REFERENCES:

  1. https://www.webmd.com/lung/copd/copd-and-heart-failure#1

 


Home Care Nursing in Winter was first posted on December 5, 2017 at 1:50 pm.
©2017 "Portea Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at chandana.das@porteamedical.com



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INDIAN (H)

General Health Care During Winter

Massage.jpg


According to studies conducted by researchers from the National Institute of Health, the cold and dry weather conditions during winters make it easier for various disease causing viruses to breed and transmit. This along with other factors like lowered sun exposure and staying indoors increase your susceptibility to a host of illnesses.

In order to prevent yourself from falling ill and miss out on all the fun that this season has to offer, consider the following tips –

  1. Massage Your Aches Away

Massage

People who suffer from arthritis or other kinds of joint pain find it very difficult to get through the winter season without the pain getting the better of them. It is a known fact that joint aches and muscle pain worsen during winter. Researchers, however, have not yet ascertained the exact reason behind this increase in pain. To keep joint pain and aches at bay, consult a physiotherapist.

  1. Get Fit

It is recommended to exercise daily in order to keep the joints supple and flexible. According to a study published by the Arthritis Care and Research in 2015, lack of regular exercise increases your chances of bone related disorders and obesity. Exercise also ensures that your blood circulation capacity stays optimal. Aim to get at least an hour of low impact exercises like walking and swimming on a daily basis.

  1. Eat Healthy

Post Pregnancy Diet Plan

During winter, the chances of you falling ill are high, so it is very important that you keep your immune system strong by adding lots of fruits and vegetables to your daily diet. Ensure to eat three to five portions of fruits every day.  Replace your sugary treats and snacks with pieces of fruits such as bananas, apples or citru fruits. Bananas are a great source of potassium, fibre, energy and vitamin B6; apples are rich in antioxidants, phytonutrients and flavonoids; oranges are a great source of vitamin C.

If having raw vegetables is not your cup of tea, try making a hot stew or vegetable soup with carrots, papayas, peas and beetroot. Papaya is also rich in antioxidants and protects you from cancer and skin damage that comes with age. Papaya is also highly beneficial to people who suffer from joint pains where there is a certain degree of inflammation involved. Peas and beetroots are both good sources of vitamin C, folate and potassium.

  1. Get that pending vaccine shot today!

 

 

Take necessary precautions by getting a flu vaccination at the earliest which can lower the chances of you suffering from the flu by about 50%. During the winter season the number of patients down with the flu is usually staggeringly high. So it is recommended that you get your flu shot done well before October or November to be on the safer side of things.

  1. Don’t Forget to Wash Your Hands!

Even though the use of hand sanitizers has always been controversial, a recent study indicates that people who used hand sanitizers regularly decreased their chances of contracting an illness than those who did not. Often in public places it is not always possible to get access to a bathroom or germ-protection soaps. In such cases using a hand sanitizer lowers your risk of picking up harmful germs by about 59%. While using one, ensure to rub your hands for a good 15-20 seconds to completely eliminate the germs.

So don’t let diseases mar your happiness. Take good of yourself and your loved ones and enjoy the winter season to its fullest. Also, it would be wise to get in touch with a trusted home health service provider to take excellent care of health, if need arises inspite of all precautions.


General Health Care During Winter was first posted on December 5, 2017 at 4:19 pm.
©2017 "Portea Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at chandana.das@porteamedical.com



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INDIAN (H)

Simple Ways to Manage Your Diabetes

Diabetes-spot-test.jpg


A diabetes diagnosis can be quite upsetting. Cheer up! for diabetes is manageable. Fact of the matter is: It isn’t all that complicated to manage your diabetes. In fact, with a few simple steps and a positive attitude, you can lead a normal happy life without worry and keep your diabetes levels in check! We’ve listed below, 7 simple ways to maintain your diabetes and stay healthy! Take a look:

  1. Spot check your sugar

Diabetes spot test

You will most likely have a set schedule arranged with your doctor to test your blood sugar. It could be at breakfast one day, lunch the next and so on. However, if you know that it is time to check your sugar, you are more likely to behave well during that particular time and pay more attention to maintaining your sugar levels and thereby ensure that the tests will show good results. It is best to spot check your sugar so that you are consciously aware that you have to maintain your health and take care of the activities you undertake throughout the day. In this way, you will also be able to pay better attention to your exercise and diet and not cheat on them.

2. Keep your weight in check

If you have to minimise the detrimental effects of diabetes on your lifestyle, the most important step is to lose weight. Research says that eight out of every ten patient of Type 2 diabetes is overweight. Hence, losing useless body fat, especially the fat around the belly, (the leading cause of diabetes) plays a key role in minimising the risk associated with the disease and keeping it under control. The most important step is to become physically active and avoid leading a sedentary lifestyle which might be affecting you in a negative way. You could opt out of driving, and instead choose to walk more often. You could also join a focus group with similar challenges and motivate yourself to get in shape.

3. Stay on a healthy diet

Diabetes diet

Your diet is a crucial component to successfully managing obesity and therefore keeping your diabetes in check. Living with diabetes definitely does not mean depriving yourself of a delicious meal, or forcing yourself to give up all of your favourite foods. However, structuring your diet in a way that helps your weight loss is extremely important.

You could stay low on foods that contain a lot of starch and stay away from beverages and carbonated drinks that can affect your weight as well as the glucose levels in your blood.  Certain types of foods like white bread, pasta, fruit-flavoured yoghurt and foods containing trans- fat should be actively avoided if you have to control your diabetes.

4. Know your numbers

Along with conducting regular blood-sugar readings, it is also extremely important to pay proper attention to other numbers like your blood pressure levels and your cholesterol levels. These numbers will help you understand if your health is on track and also help you in understanding if you need to undertake any change in your lifestyle.

Some of the numbers which you need to pay attention to are :

  • A1c, which measures the blood sugar levels over time. This should be done at least twice a year.
  • Cholesterol levels, which should be tested at least every five years, but more often if you have trouble keeping your cholesterol levels under check and if you are taking preventive measures against them.
  • Your blood pressure and weight, which will be checked every time you visit the doctor.

5. Keep track of the medications you use

Diabetes medication

Even if you are keeping track of the food and beverages you consume, it is also necessary to look into other aspects of your health like what kind of medications you consume, and make sure that your health is a top priority. Most of the drugs you use might be recommended by your physician, you should also research a bit on your own, and understand their side effects before you use them. Certain types of diabetes medications like Invokana, has some serious side effects that you should be aware of. Some of the side effects include: high levels of blood acids in diabetes patients, dizziness, light-headedness and a dry mouth.

6. Build a support team and be informed and empowered

If you have to battle this disease, you will be needing support from a number of people who are informed on the disease and the knowledge of an ideal lifestyle for people who suffer from Diabetes. Form a support team consisting of your doctor, nurse practitioner, diabetes educators, dieticians, nutritionists, endocrinologists and pharmacists. Even though having a great support team is very essential in controlling the health risks associated with diabetes, being empowered also goes a long way. Actively engage yourself in your lifestyle and stay informed. Ask questions and practice healthy habits.

7. Lower your stress levels

Higher stress levels makes your muscles prepare to fight or run away from danger, also known as ‘fight or flight’! When your insulin isn’t working properly, this process floods your blood with Glucose (sugar) to help it combat the situation at hand!

This can have very harmful effects on your body, and hence it is very necessary to lower stress levels actively.

Excessive stress also raises your blood pressure and increases your chances of heart disease. If you smoke to relieve your stress, you should consider quitting it immediately because it affects your lungs and narrows your blood vessels, and further prove detrimental to your health when you have a disease like diabetes. For efficient diabetes management, you can enroll in an efficient diabetes monitoring and management program. Also, there is increasing scientific evidence that there is a link between sleep apnea and diabetes. These days with a variety of convenient options, you can get your sleep study done for efficient management of sleep apnea.


Simple Ways to Manage Your Diabetes was first posted on December 19, 2017 at 1:54 pm.
©2017 "Portea Blog". Use of this feed is for personal non-commercial use only. If you are not reading this article in your feed reader, then the site is guilty of copyright infringement. Please contact me at chandana.das@porteamedical.com



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INDIAN (H)

Remember the Fortis medical bill worth Rs 16 lakh? This law will ensure it never happens again

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The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.
The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.

In November last year, Fortis Memorial Research Institute (Gurgaon) charged the family of a seven-year-old dengue patient nearly Rs 16 lakh for 15 days in the ICU. The girl died while being shifted from Fortis to Rockland Hospital.

Hospitals in big cities inflate costs of medicine, etc., sometimes 100s of times. According to Satyendar Jain, the health minister of the Delhi state, there have been instances in the past in which private hospitals were found to have charged 1,000% to 1,700% margins on medicines and consumables.

Patients and their relatives will not have to deal with such inflated medical bills in Delhi, if a Bill being prepared by the Delhi government becomes law.

The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback. After 30 days, the government would make amendments to the Delhi Nursing Homes Registration Act to make the draft policy changes legally binding, state health minister Satyendar Jain told TOI.

Following are the highlights of the draft:

1. Prescription of NLEM medicine
As per the policy draft, private hospitals and nursing homes will have to preferably prescribe from the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM), the prices of which are regulated by the central government. For non-NLEM drugs and even disposables, we have decided that hospitals can charge a maximum 50% as mark-up against administrative/handling charges over and above its procurement or maximum retail price (MRP), whichever is lesser.

2. Fixed mark-up on implants
In the case of implants, too, many consumer groups and patients have been raising the issue of over-pricing and profiteering by private hospitals. The draft policy has fixed a mark-up of not more than 35% above the procurement price for that.

3. Fixed price for various procedures
The draft policy suggests fixed pricing for packages for various procedures. Also, it suggests that any additional procedure performed on the patient who has opted for a particular package will be charged at 50% of its original rate and that patients should be offered the choice of opting for a high-risk package that covers all possible complications and that it should not cost more than 20% higher.

The Economic Survey 2015-16, prepared by Chief Economic Advisor Arvind Subramanian and tabled in Parliament in February 2016, had pointed out large gap between the cost of government and private healthcare. “NSSO (2015) reports that the average medical expenditure for treatment (excluding child birth) per hospitalized case if treated in private hospital was about four times than that of public hospital during January-June 2014. On an average, Rs 25,850 was spent for treatment per hospitalized case by people in the private facilities as against Rs 6,120 in the public health facilities,” said the survey.

Not just this. The next year Subramanian wrote in the Economic Survey that government should take action, including imposing fines, against hospitals for inflated costs. “There has to be concerted efforts by the Central and State governments to reform the health sector, by addressing quality issues, standardising rates for diagnostic tests, generating awareness about alternative health systems and introduction of punitive measures like fines on hospitals and private health providers for false claims through surgery, medicines, etc.,” he wrote.



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INDIAN (H)

Remember the Fortis medical bill worth Rs 16 lakh? This law will ensure it never happens again

no thumb


The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.
The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.

In November last year, Fortis Memorial Research Institute (Gurgaon) charged the family of a seven-year-old dengue patient nearly Rs 16 lakh for 15 days in the ICU. The girl died while being shifted from Fortis to Rockland Hospital.

Hospitals in big cities inflate costs of medicine, etc., sometimes 100s of times. According to Satyendar Jain, the health minister of the Delhi state, there have been instances in the past in which private hospitals were found to have charged 1,000% to 1,700% margins on medicines and consumables.

Patients and their relatives will not have to deal with such inflated medical bills in Delhi, if a Bill being prepared by the Delhi government becomes law.

The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback. After 30 days, the government would make amendments to the Delhi Nursing Homes Registration Act to make the draft policy changes legally binding, state health minister Satyendar Jain told TOI.

Following are the highlights of the draft:

1. Prescription of NLEM medicine
As per the policy draft, private hospitals and nursing homes will have to preferably prescribe from the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM), the prices of which are regulated by the central government. For non-NLEM drugs and even disposables, we have decided that hospitals can charge a maximum 50% as mark-up against administrative/handling charges over and above its procurement or maximum retail price (MRP), whichever is lesser.

2. Fixed mark-up on implants
In the case of implants, too, many consumer groups and patients have been raising the issue of over-pricing and profiteering by private hospitals. The draft policy has fixed a mark-up of not more than 35% above the procurement price for that.

3. Fixed price for various procedures
The draft policy suggests fixed pricing for packages for various procedures. Also, it suggests that any additional procedure performed on the patient who has opted for a particular package will be charged at 50% of its original rate and that patients should be offered the choice of opting for a high-risk package that covers all possible complications and that it should not cost more than 20% higher.

The Economic Survey 2015-16, prepared by Chief Economic Advisor Arvind Subramanian and tabled in Parliament in February 2016, had pointed out large gap between the cost of government and private healthcare. “NSSO (2015) reports that the average medical expenditure for treatment (excluding child birth) per hospitalized case if treated in private hospital was about four times than that of public hospital during January-June 2014. On an average, Rs 25,850 was spent for treatment per hospitalized case by people in the private facilities as against Rs 6,120 in the public health facilities,” said the survey.

Not just this. The next year Subramanian wrote in the Economic Survey that government should take action, including imposing fines, against hospitals for inflated costs. “There has to be concerted efforts by the Central and State governments to reform the health sector, by addressing quality issues, standardising rates for diagnostic tests, generating awareness about alternative health systems and introduction of punitive measures like fines on hospitals and private health providers for false claims through surgery, medicines, etc.,” he wrote.



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INDIAN (H)

Remember the Fortis medical bill worth Rs 16 lakh? This law will ensure it never happens again

no thumb


The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.
The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.

In November last year, Fortis Memorial Research Institute (Gurgaon) charged the family of a seven-year-old dengue patient nearly Rs 16 lakh for 15 days in the ICU. The girl died while being shifted from Fortis to Rockland Hospital.

Hospitals in big cities inflate costs of medicine, etc., sometimes 100s of times. According to Satyendar Jain, the health minister of the Delhi state, there have been instances in the past in which private hospitals were found to have charged 1,000% to 1,700% margins on medicines and consumables.

Patients and their relatives will not have to deal with such inflated medical bills in Delhi, if a Bill being prepared by the Delhi government becomes law.

The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback. After 30 days, the government would make amendments to the Delhi Nursing Homes Registration Act to make the draft policy changes legally binding, state health minister Satyendar Jain told TOI.

Following are the highlights of the draft:

1. Prescription of NLEM medicine
As per the policy draft, private hospitals and nursing homes will have to preferably prescribe from the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM), the prices of which are regulated by the central government. For non-NLEM drugs and even disposables, we have decided that hospitals can charge a maximum 50% as mark-up against administrative/handling charges over and above its procurement or maximum retail price (MRP), whichever is lesser.

2. Fixed mark-up on implants
In the case of implants, too, many consumer groups and patients have been raising the issue of over-pricing and profiteering by private hospitals. The draft policy has fixed a mark-up of not more than 35% above the procurement price for that.

3. Fixed price for various procedures
The draft policy suggests fixed pricing for packages for various procedures. Also, it suggests that any additional procedure performed on the patient who has opted for a particular package will be charged at 50% of its original rate and that patients should be offered the choice of opting for a high-risk package that covers all possible complications and that it should not cost more than 20% higher.

The Economic Survey 2015-16, prepared by Chief Economic Advisor Arvind Subramanian and tabled in Parliament in February 2016, had pointed out large gap between the cost of government and private healthcare. “NSSO (2015) reports that the average medical expenditure for treatment (excluding child birth) per hospitalized case if treated in private hospital was about four times than that of public hospital during January-June 2014. On an average, Rs 25,850 was spent for treatment per hospitalized case by people in the private facilities as against Rs 6,120 in the public health facilities,” said the survey.

Not just this. The next year Subramanian wrote in the Economic Survey that government should take action, including imposing fines, against hospitals for inflated costs. “There has to be concerted efforts by the Central and State governments to reform the health sector, by addressing quality issues, standardising rates for diagnostic tests, generating awareness about alternative health systems and introduction of punitive measures like fines on hospitals and private health providers for false claims through surgery, medicines, etc.,” he wrote.



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INDIAN (H)

Remember the Fortis medical bill worth Rs 16 lakh? This law will ensure it never happens again

no thumb


The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.
The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.

In November last year, Fortis Memorial Research Institute (Gurgaon) charged the family of a seven-year-old dengue patient nearly Rs 16 lakh for 15 days in the ICU. The girl died while being shifted from Fortis to Rockland Hospital.

Hospitals in big cities inflate costs of medicine, etc., sometimes 100s of times. According to Satyendar Jain, the health minister of the Delhi state, there have been instances in the past in which private hospitals were found to have charged 1,000% to 1,700% margins on medicines and consumables.

Patients and their relatives will not have to deal with such inflated medical bills in Delhi, if a Bill being prepared by the Delhi government becomes law.

The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback. After 30 days, the government would make amendments to the Delhi Nursing Homes Registration Act to make the draft policy changes legally binding, state health minister Satyendar Jain told TOI.

Following are the highlights of the draft:

1. Prescription of NLEM medicine
As per the policy draft, private hospitals and nursing homes will have to preferably prescribe from the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM), the prices of which are regulated by the central government. For non-NLEM drugs and even disposables, we have decided that hospitals can charge a maximum 50% as mark-up against administrative/handling charges over and above its procurement or maximum retail price (MRP), whichever is lesser.

2. Fixed mark-up on implants
In the case of implants, too, many consumer groups and patients have been raising the issue of over-pricing and profiteering by private hospitals. The draft policy has fixed a mark-up of not more than 35% above the procurement price for that.

3. Fixed price for various procedures
The draft policy suggests fixed pricing for packages for various procedures. Also, it suggests that any additional procedure performed on the patient who has opted for a particular package will be charged at 50% of its original rate and that patients should be offered the choice of opting for a high-risk package that covers all possible complications and that it should not cost more than 20% higher.

The Economic Survey 2015-16, prepared by Chief Economic Advisor Arvind Subramanian and tabled in Parliament in February 2016, had pointed out large gap between the cost of government and private healthcare. “NSSO (2015) reports that the average medical expenditure for treatment (excluding child birth) per hospitalized case if treated in private hospital was about four times than that of public hospital during January-June 2014. On an average, Rs 25,850 was spent for treatment per hospitalized case by people in the private facilities as against Rs 6,120 in the public health facilities,” said the survey.

Not just this. The next year Subramanian wrote in the Economic Survey that government should take action, including imposing fines, against hospitals for inflated costs. “There has to be concerted efforts by the Central and State governments to reform the health sector, by addressing quality issues, standardising rates for diagnostic tests, generating awareness about alternative health systems and introduction of punitive measures like fines on hospitals and private health providers for false claims through surgery, medicines, etc.,” he wrote.



Source link

read more
INDIAN (H)

Remember the Fortis medical bill worth Rs 16 lakh? This law will ensure it never happens again

no thumb


The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.
The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.

In November last year, Fortis Memorial Research Institute (Gurgaon) charged the family of a seven-year-old dengue patient nearly Rs 16 lakh for 15 days in the ICU. The girl died while being shifted from Fortis to Rockland Hospital.

Hospitals in big cities inflate costs of medicine, etc., sometimes 100s of times. According to Satyendar Jain, the health minister of the Delhi state, there have been instances in the past in which private hospitals were found to have charged 1,000% to 1,700% margins on medicines and consumables.

Patients and their relatives will not have to deal with such inflated medical bills in Delhi, if a Bill being prepared by the Delhi government becomes law.

The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback. After 30 days, the government would make amendments to the Delhi Nursing Homes Registration Act to make the draft policy changes legally binding, state health minister Satyendar Jain told TOI.

Following are the highlights of the draft:

1. Prescription of NLEM medicine
As per the policy draft, private hospitals and nursing homes will have to preferably prescribe from the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM), the prices of which are regulated by the central government. For non-NLEM drugs and even disposables, we have decided that hospitals can charge a maximum 50% as mark-up against administrative/handling charges over and above its procurement or maximum retail price (MRP), whichever is lesser.

2. Fixed mark-up on implants
In the case of implants, too, many consumer groups and patients have been raising the issue of over-pricing and profiteering by private hospitals. The draft policy has fixed a mark-up of not more than 35% above the procurement price for that.

3. Fixed price for various procedures
The draft policy suggests fixed pricing for packages for various procedures. Also, it suggests that any additional procedure performed on the patient who has opted for a particular package will be charged at 50% of its original rate and that patients should be offered the choice of opting for a high-risk package that covers all possible complications and that it should not cost more than 20% higher.

The Economic Survey 2015-16, prepared by Chief Economic Advisor Arvind Subramanian and tabled in Parliament in February 2016, had pointed out large gap between the cost of government and private healthcare. “NSSO (2015) reports that the average medical expenditure for treatment (excluding child birth) per hospitalized case if treated in private hospital was about four times than that of public hospital during January-June 2014. On an average, Rs 25,850 was spent for treatment per hospitalized case by people in the private facilities as against Rs 6,120 in the public health facilities,” said the survey.

Not just this. The next year Subramanian wrote in the Economic Survey that government should take action, including imposing fines, against hospitals for inflated costs. “There has to be concerted efforts by the Central and State governments to reform the health sector, by addressing quality issues, standardising rates for diagnostic tests, generating awareness about alternative health systems and introduction of punitive measures like fines on hospitals and private health providers for false claims through surgery, medicines, etc.,” he wrote.



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INDIAN (H)

Remember the Fortis medical bill worth Rs 16 lakh? This law will ensure it never happens again

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The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.
The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback.

In November last year, Fortis Memorial Research Institute (Gurgaon) charged the family of a seven-year-old dengue patient nearly Rs 16 lakh for 15 days in the ICU. The girl died while being shifted from Fortis to Rockland Hospital.

Hospitals in big cities inflate costs of medicine, etc., sometimes 100s of times. According to Satyendar Jain, the health minister of the Delhi state, there have been instances in the past in which private hospitals were found to have charged 1,000% to 1,700% margins on medicines and consumables.

Patients and their relatives will not have to deal with such inflated medical bills in Delhi, if a Bill being prepared by the Delhi government becomes law.

The Delhi government on Monday put the draft prepared by it on capping of profits by private hospitals in the public domain for scrutiny and feedback. After 30 days, the government would make amendments to the Delhi Nursing Homes Registration Act to make the draft policy changes legally binding, state health minister Satyendar Jain told TOI.

Following are the highlights of the draft:

1. Prescription of NLEM medicine
As per the policy draft, private hospitals and nursing homes will have to preferably prescribe from the National List of Essential Medicines (NLEM), the prices of which are regulated by the central government. For non-NLEM drugs and even disposables, we have decided that hospitals can charge a maximum 50% as mark-up against administrative/handling charges over and above its procurement or maximum retail price (MRP), whichever is lesser.

2. Fixed mark-up on implants
In the case of implants, too, many consumer groups and patients have been raising the issue of over-pricing and profiteering by private hospitals. The draft policy has fixed a mark-up of not more than 35% above the procurement price for that.

3. Fixed price for various procedures
The draft policy suggests fixed pricing for packages for various procedures. Also, it suggests that any additional procedure performed on the patient who has opted for a particular package will be charged at 50% of its original rate and that patients should be offered the choice of opting for a high-risk package that covers all possible complications and that it should not cost more than 20% higher.

The Economic Survey 2015-16, prepared by Chief Economic Advisor Arvind Subramanian and tabled in Parliament in February 2016, had pointed out large gap between the cost of government and private healthcare. “NSSO (2015) reports that the average medical expenditure for treatment (excluding child birth) per hospitalized case if treated in private hospital was about four times than that of public hospital during January-June 2014. On an average, Rs 25,850 was spent for treatment per hospitalized case by people in the private facilities as against Rs 6,120 in the public health facilities,” said the survey.

Not just this. The next year Subramanian wrote in the Economic Survey that government should take action, including imposing fines, against hospitals for inflated costs. “There has to be concerted efforts by the Central and State governments to reform the health sector, by addressing quality issues, standardising rates for diagnostic tests, generating awareness about alternative health systems and introduction of punitive measures like fines on hospitals and private health providers for false claims through surgery, medicines, etc.,” he wrote.



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