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American Black Film Festival Develops Hollywood’s Next Stars in Boot Camp

ABFF-Greenlighters-Academ-6b6a0bd3b3128c6d59e5880d3d2c153a78575f97

This spring, the American Black Film Festival—June 14–18 in Miami Beach—held its first ABFF Greenlighters Academy, a two-day boot camp in which five fellows mostly from historically black colleges met industry professionals, engaged in roundtable discussions, and learned what it takes to pursue a corporate career in the film industry.

(Image: iStock/RossellaApostoli)

 

Two of the fellows have been offered top-tier summer internships, and one is being considered for a full-time post at HBO.

The ABFF Greenlighters Academy Fellows

 

Te’Shone Davidson is a junior Journalism and Mass Communication student who specializes in public relations at North Carolina A&T State University. Davidson has been asked to participate in a Creative Artists Agency-produced program during ABFF this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

K. Giselle Johnson graduated with honors from Howard University as a Film and Television major with a minor in Theater Arts. Johnson will begin an internship at Viacom in Los Angeles this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Allan Meade graduated with honors from North Carolina A&T State University with a degree in Journalism and Mass Communications. He is being considered for an entry-level position at HBO.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Chinedum Nwaigwe studies Film and African & African-American Studies at Dartmouth. She also chairs the Black Underground Theater & Arts Association, following in the footsteps of former presidents, including writer and executive producer Shonda Rhimes. She will begin an internship at Facebook this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Maya Smith is a senior at Clark Atlanta University where she studies Mass Media Arts with a concentration in Public Relations. She has been asked to participate in a CAA-produced program during ABFF this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

‘What Didn’t I Learn?’

 

When Meade was asked what he learned during the two-day program, he responded, “What didn’t I learn?” hinting at the program’s broad sweep and exposure.

With a goal of providing the information and access needed to steer the Fellows’ career toward corporate leadership positions, the ABFF Greenlighters Academy Fellows “attended sessions with top corporate entertainment executives who described their career trajectory, conducted ‘Day in the Life’ seminars, and engaged … in ‘Ask Me Anything’ roundtable discussions,” according to an ABFF spokeswoman. The Fellows also visited the office of FOX Studios and the corporate office of Creative Artists Agency.

They met more than a few heavy hitters too, including Kevin Hart, Jeff Friday of ABFF, and Tim Story, founder of the Story Co., as well as Devon Franklin, with whom they enjoyed a power lunch; and other executives like Misha Green and Stacy Milner, founder of the Entertainment Industry College Outreach Program.

From learning how projects actually get “green lit” to the formula for acquiring/licensing content and meeting reps from various studios, the two days ended with each student’s metaphorical cup running over.

For more information about the ABFF Greenlighters Academy, go here.

read more
Fashion(AA)

American Black Film Festival Develops Hollywood’s Next Stars in Boot Camp

ABFF-Greenlighters-Academ-6b6a0bd3b3128c6d59e5880d3d2c153a78575f97

This spring, the American Black Film Festival—June 14–18 in Miami Beach—held its first ABFF Greenlighters Academy, a two-day boot camp in which five fellows mostly from historically black colleges met industry professionals, engaged in roundtable discussions, and learned what it takes to pursue a corporate career in the film industry.

(Image: iStock/RossellaApostoli)

 

Two of the fellows have been offered top-tier summer internships, and one is being considered for a full-time post at HBO.

The ABFF Greenlighters Academy Fellows

 

Te’Shone Davidson is a junior Journalism and Mass Communication student who specializes in public relations at North Carolina A&T State University. Davidson has been asked to participate in a Creative Artists Agency-produced program during ABFF this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

K. Giselle Johnson graduated with honors from Howard University as a Film and Television major with a minor in Theater Arts. Johnson will begin an internship at Viacom in Los Angeles this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Allan Meade graduated with honors from North Carolina A&T State University with a degree in Journalism and Mass Communications. He is being considered for an entry-level position at HBO.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Chinedum Nwaigwe studies Film and African & African-American Studies at Dartmouth. She also chairs the Black Underground Theater & Arts Association, following in the footsteps of former presidents, including writer and executive producer Shonda Rhimes. She will begin an internship at Facebook this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Maya Smith is a senior at Clark Atlanta University where she studies Mass Media Arts with a concentration in Public Relations. She has been asked to participate in a CAA-produced program during ABFF this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

‘What Didn’t I Learn?’

 

When Meade was asked what he learned during the two-day program, he responded, “What didn’t I learn?” hinting at the program’s broad sweep and exposure.

With a goal of providing the information and access needed to steer the Fellows’ career toward corporate leadership positions, the ABFF Greenlighters Academy Fellows “attended sessions with top corporate entertainment executives who described their career trajectory, conducted ‘Day in the Life’ seminars, and engaged … in ‘Ask Me Anything’ roundtable discussions,” according to an ABFF spokeswoman. The Fellows also visited the office of FOX Studios and the corporate office of Creative Artists Agency.

They met more than a few heavy hitters too, including Kevin Hart, Jeff Friday of ABFF, and Tim Story, founder of the Story Co., as well as Devon Franklin, with whom they enjoyed a power lunch; and other executives like Misha Green and Stacy Milner, founder of the Entertainment Industry College Outreach Program.

From learning how projects actually get “green lit” to the formula for acquiring/licensing content and meeting reps from various studios, the two days ended with each student’s metaphorical cup running over.

For more information about the ABFF Greenlighters Academy, go here.

read more
Fashion(AA)

American Black Film Festival Develops Hollywood’s Next Stars in Boot Camp

ABFF-Greenlighters-Academ-6b6a0bd3b3128c6d59e5880d3d2c153a78575f97

This spring, the American Black Film Festival—June 14–18 in Miami Beach—held its first ABFF Greenlighters Academy, a two-day boot camp in which five fellows mostly from historically black colleges met industry professionals, engaged in roundtable discussions, and learned what it takes to pursue a corporate career in the film industry.

(Image: iStock/RossellaApostoli)

 

Two of the fellows have been offered top-tier summer internships, and one is being considered for a full-time post at HBO.

The ABFF Greenlighters Academy Fellows

 

Te’Shone Davidson is a junior Journalism and Mass Communication student who specializes in public relations at North Carolina A&T State University. Davidson has been asked to participate in a Creative Artists Agency-produced program during ABFF this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

K. Giselle Johnson graduated with honors from Howard University as a Film and Television major with a minor in Theater Arts. Johnson will begin an internship at Viacom in Los Angeles this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Allan Meade graduated with honors from North Carolina A&T State University with a degree in Journalism and Mass Communications. He is being considered for an entry-level position at HBO.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Chinedum Nwaigwe studies Film and African & African-American Studies at Dartmouth. She also chairs the Black Underground Theater & Arts Association, following in the footsteps of former presidents, including writer and executive producer Shonda Rhimes. She will begin an internship at Facebook this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Maya Smith is a senior at Clark Atlanta University where she studies Mass Media Arts with a concentration in Public Relations. She has been asked to participate in a CAA-produced program during ABFF this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

‘What Didn’t I Learn?’

 

When Meade was asked what he learned during the two-day program, he responded, “What didn’t I learn?” hinting at the program’s broad sweep and exposure.

With a goal of providing the information and access needed to steer the Fellows’ career toward corporate leadership positions, the ABFF Greenlighters Academy Fellows “attended sessions with top corporate entertainment executives who described their career trajectory, conducted ‘Day in the Life’ seminars, and engaged … in ‘Ask Me Anything’ roundtable discussions,” according to an ABFF spokeswoman. The Fellows also visited the office of FOX Studios and the corporate office of Creative Artists Agency.

They met more than a few heavy hitters too, including Kevin Hart, Jeff Friday of ABFF, and Tim Story, founder of the Story Co., as well as Devon Franklin, with whom they enjoyed a power lunch; and other executives like Misha Green and Stacy Milner, founder of the Entertainment Industry College Outreach Program.

From learning how projects actually get “green lit” to the formula for acquiring/licensing content and meeting reps from various studios, the two days ended with each student’s metaphorical cup running over.

For more information about the ABFF Greenlighters Academy, go here.

read more
Fashion(AA)

American Black Film Festival Develops Hollywood’s Next Stars in Boot Camp

ABFF-Greenlighters-Academ-6b6a0bd3b3128c6d59e5880d3d2c153a78575f97

This spring, the American Black Film Festival—June 14–18 in Miami Beach—held its first ABFF Greenlighters Academy, a two-day boot camp in which five fellows mostly from historically black colleges met industry professionals, engaged in roundtable discussions, and learned what it takes to pursue a corporate career in the film industry.

(Image: iStock/RossellaApostoli)

 

Two of the fellows have been offered top-tier summer internships, and one is being considered for a full-time post at HBO.

The ABFF Greenlighters Academy Fellows

 

Te’Shone Davidson is a junior Journalism and Mass Communication student who specializes in public relations at North Carolina A&T State University. Davidson has been asked to participate in a Creative Artists Agency-produced program during ABFF this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

K. Giselle Johnson graduated with honors from Howard University as a Film and Television major with a minor in Theater Arts. Johnson will begin an internship at Viacom in Los Angeles this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Allan Meade graduated with honors from North Carolina A&T State University with a degree in Journalism and Mass Communications. He is being considered for an entry-level position at HBO.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Chinedum Nwaigwe studies Film and African & African-American Studies at Dartmouth. She also chairs the Black Underground Theater & Arts Association, following in the footsteps of former presidents, including writer and executive producer Shonda Rhimes. She will begin an internship at Facebook this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Maya Smith is a senior at Clark Atlanta University where she studies Mass Media Arts with a concentration in Public Relations. She has been asked to participate in a CAA-produced program during ABFF this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

‘What Didn’t I Learn?’

 

When Meade was asked what he learned during the two-day program, he responded, “What didn’t I learn?” hinting at the program’s broad sweep and exposure.

With a goal of providing the information and access needed to steer the Fellows’ career toward corporate leadership positions, the ABFF Greenlighters Academy Fellows “attended sessions with top corporate entertainment executives who described their career trajectory, conducted ‘Day in the Life’ seminars, and engaged … in ‘Ask Me Anything’ roundtable discussions,” according to an ABFF spokeswoman. The Fellows also visited the office of FOX Studios and the corporate office of Creative Artists Agency.

They met more than a few heavy hitters too, including Kevin Hart, Jeff Friday of ABFF, and Tim Story, founder of the Story Co., as well as Devon Franklin, with whom they enjoyed a power lunch; and other executives like Misha Green and Stacy Milner, founder of the Entertainment Industry College Outreach Program.

From learning how projects actually get “green lit” to the formula for acquiring/licensing content and meeting reps from various studios, the two days ended with each student’s metaphorical cup running over.

For more information about the ABFF Greenlighters Academy, go here.

read more
Fashion(AA)

American Black Film Festival Develops Hollywood’s Next Stars in Boot Camp

ABFF-Greenlighters-Academ-6b6a0bd3b3128c6d59e5880d3d2c153a78575f97

This spring, the American Black Film Festival—June 14–18 in Miami Beach—held its first ABFF Greenlighters Academy, a two-day boot camp in which five fellows mostly from historically black colleges met industry professionals, engaged in roundtable discussions, and learned what it takes to pursue a corporate career in the film industry.

(Image: iStock/RossellaApostoli)

 

Two of the fellows have been offered top-tier summer internships, and one is being considered for a full-time post at HBO.

The ABFF Greenlighters Academy Fellows

 

Te’Shone Davidson is a junior Journalism and Mass Communication student who specializes in public relations at North Carolina A&T State University. Davidson has been asked to participate in a Creative Artists Agency-produced program during ABFF this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

K. Giselle Johnson graduated with honors from Howard University as a Film and Television major with a minor in Theater Arts. Johnson will begin an internship at Viacom in Los Angeles this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Allan Meade graduated with honors from North Carolina A&T State University with a degree in Journalism and Mass Communications. He is being considered for an entry-level position at HBO.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Chinedum Nwaigwe studies Film and African & African-American Studies at Dartmouth. She also chairs the Black Underground Theater & Arts Association, following in the footsteps of former presidents, including writer and executive producer Shonda Rhimes. She will begin an internship at Facebook this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Maya Smith is a senior at Clark Atlanta University where she studies Mass Media Arts with a concentration in Public Relations. She has been asked to participate in a CAA-produced program during ABFF this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

‘What Didn’t I Learn?’

 

When Meade was asked what he learned during the two-day program, he responded, “What didn’t I learn?” hinting at the program’s broad sweep and exposure.

With a goal of providing the information and access needed to steer the Fellows’ career toward corporate leadership positions, the ABFF Greenlighters Academy Fellows “attended sessions with top corporate entertainment executives who described their career trajectory, conducted ‘Day in the Life’ seminars, and engaged … in ‘Ask Me Anything’ roundtable discussions,” according to an ABFF spokeswoman. The Fellows also visited the office of FOX Studios and the corporate office of Creative Artists Agency.

They met more than a few heavy hitters too, including Kevin Hart, Jeff Friday of ABFF, and Tim Story, founder of the Story Co., as well as Devon Franklin, with whom they enjoyed a power lunch; and other executives like Misha Green and Stacy Milner, founder of the Entertainment Industry College Outreach Program.

From learning how projects actually get “green lit” to the formula for acquiring/licensing content and meeting reps from various studios, the two days ended with each student’s metaphorical cup running over.

For more information about the ABFF Greenlighters Academy, go here.

read more
Fashion(AA)

American Black Film Festival Develops Hollywood’s Next Stars in Boot Camp

ABFF-Greenlighters-Academ-6b6a0bd3b3128c6d59e5880d3d2c153a78575f97

This spring, the American Black Film Festival—June 14–18 in Miami Beach—held its first ABFF Greenlighters Academy, a two-day boot camp in which five fellows mostly from historically black colleges met industry professionals, engaged in roundtable discussions, and learned what it takes to pursue a corporate career in the film industry.

(Image: iStock/RossellaApostoli)

 

Two of the fellows have been offered top-tier summer internships, and one is being considered for a full-time post at HBO.

The ABFF Greenlighters Academy Fellows

 

Te’Shone Davidson is a junior Journalism and Mass Communication student who specializes in public relations at North Carolina A&T State University. Davidson has been asked to participate in a Creative Artists Agency-produced program during ABFF this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

K. Giselle Johnson graduated with honors from Howard University as a Film and Television major with a minor in Theater Arts. Johnson will begin an internship at Viacom in Los Angeles this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Allan Meade graduated with honors from North Carolina A&T State University with a degree in Journalism and Mass Communications. He is being considered for an entry-level position at HBO.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Chinedum Nwaigwe studies Film and African & African-American Studies at Dartmouth. She also chairs the Black Underground Theater & Arts Association, following in the footsteps of former presidents, including writer and executive producer Shonda Rhimes. She will begin an internship at Facebook this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Maya Smith is a senior at Clark Atlanta University where she studies Mass Media Arts with a concentration in Public Relations. She has been asked to participate in a CAA-produced program during ABFF this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

‘What Didn’t I Learn?’

 

When Meade was asked what he learned during the two-day program, he responded, “What didn’t I learn?” hinting at the program’s broad sweep and exposure.

With a goal of providing the information and access needed to steer the Fellows’ career toward corporate leadership positions, the ABFF Greenlighters Academy Fellows “attended sessions with top corporate entertainment executives who described their career trajectory, conducted ‘Day in the Life’ seminars, and engaged … in ‘Ask Me Anything’ roundtable discussions,” according to an ABFF spokeswoman. The Fellows also visited the office of FOX Studios and the corporate office of Creative Artists Agency.

They met more than a few heavy hitters too, including Kevin Hart, Jeff Friday of ABFF, and Tim Story, founder of the Story Co., as well as Devon Franklin, with whom they enjoyed a power lunch; and other executives like Misha Green and Stacy Milner, founder of the Entertainment Industry College Outreach Program.

From learning how projects actually get “green lit” to the formula for acquiring/licensing content and meeting reps from various studios, the two days ended with each student’s metaphorical cup running over.

For more information about the ABFF Greenlighters Academy, go here.

read more
Fashion(AA)

American Black Film Festival Develops Hollywood’s Next Stars in Boot Camp

ABFF-Greenlighters-Academ-6b6a0bd3b3128c6d59e5880d3d2c153a78575f97

This spring, the American Black Film Festival—June 14–18 in Miami Beach—held its first ABFF Greenlighters Academy, a two-day boot camp in which five fellows mostly from historically black colleges met industry professionals, engaged in roundtable discussions, and learned what it takes to pursue a corporate career in the film industry.

(Image: iStock/RossellaApostoli)

 

Two of the fellows have been offered top-tier summer internships, and one is being considered for a full-time post at HBO.

The ABFF Greenlighters Academy Fellows

 

Te’Shone Davidson is a junior Journalism and Mass Communication student who specializes in public relations at North Carolina A&T State University. Davidson has been asked to participate in a Creative Artists Agency-produced program during ABFF this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

K. Giselle Johnson graduated with honors from Howard University as a Film and Television major with a minor in Theater Arts. Johnson will begin an internship at Viacom in Los Angeles this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Allan Meade graduated with honors from North Carolina A&T State University with a degree in Journalism and Mass Communications. He is being considered for an entry-level position at HBO.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Chinedum Nwaigwe studies Film and African & African-American Studies at Dartmouth. She also chairs the Black Underground Theater & Arts Association, following in the footsteps of former presidents, including writer and executive producer Shonda Rhimes. She will begin an internship at Facebook this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

Maya Smith is a senior at Clark Atlanta University where she studies Mass Media Arts with a concentration in Public Relations. She has been asked to participate in a CAA-produced program during ABFF this summer.

(Image: Courtesy of ABFF Greenlighters Academy)

 

‘What Didn’t I Learn?’

 

When Meade was asked what he learned during the two-day program, he responded, “What didn’t I learn?” hinting at the program’s broad sweep and exposure.

With a goal of providing the information and access needed to steer the Fellows’ career toward corporate leadership positions, the ABFF Greenlighters Academy Fellows “attended sessions with top corporate entertainment executives who described their career trajectory, conducted ‘Day in the Life’ seminars, and engaged … in ‘Ask Me Anything’ roundtable discussions,” according to an ABFF spokeswoman. The Fellows also visited the office of FOX Studios and the corporate office of Creative Artists Agency.

They met more than a few heavy hitters too, including Kevin Hart, Jeff Friday of ABFF, and Tim Story, founder of the Story Co., as well as Devon Franklin, with whom they enjoyed a power lunch; and other executives like Misha Green and Stacy Milner, founder of the Entertainment Industry College Outreach Program.

From learning how projects actually get “green lit” to the formula for acquiring/licensing content and meeting reps from various studios, the two days ended with each student’s metaphorical cup running over.

For more information about the ABFF Greenlighters Academy, go here.

read more
Fashion(AA)

New York State Votes to Shorten Common Core Testing Days

iStock-517687808-300×232-059d7a977b457d6a012e7221ab2a1831fb183a2d

It’s been announced that the Common Core exams in New York state will be shortened by two days, making the exams comprise four days of testing instead of six.

(Image: iStock/smartboy10)

 

That’s according to News12 Westchester, which says the move will take effect next spring after education officials in the state voted to reduce the number of days set aside for testing.

Beginning of the End?

 

The tests, which have been euphemistically described as “unpopular,”—despised and detested might be more accurate—were also modified last year in New York in response to angry opposition from parents on the left and the right.

It’s been reported that about 20% of families boycotted the tests in recent years.

It really makes you wonder if Common Core is slowly being phased out. Or maybe just the name will change and people will feel much better about it—the way some states avoided using the words “Affordable Care Act” and named President Obama’s signature healthcare law something else, thereby making it more palatable for their constituents (and beneficiaries of the law).

“Next month Common Core will be re-dubbed the Next Generation Learning Standards,” News12 Westchester reports. Clearly the words “Common Core” have become too radioactive to retain.

What’s Wrong with the Common Core?

 

A lot of the reaction to the Common Core is irrational. All states already had standards—all of which were too low (except maybe those of Massachusetts, which has the best schools in the nation).

Just about all K-12 international students who come to study in the U.S. find the work much easier than in their home country. A sixth-grade Japanese boy who had studied in the U.S. and then returned to Japan is quoted in the front matter of the new book by Cornelius N. Grove, The Drive to Learn, as saying: “[In America], you really didn’t have to really, really do it.”

I’m for high expectations of all kids, coupled with abundant academic support within a context of social-emotional learning. I’m for seeing troubled kids as #SadNotBad, but also for holding those kids to high academic standards—since education is the one nearly guaranteed route out of poverty with all its attendant problems. And I’m for providing more funding and resources, not less, to high-poverty schools, which tend to have more troubled kids—often because of the stresses the kids are exposed to at home.

Of course, kids need lots of reading, lots of math, lots of project-based learning, and inquiry-based science. They need to get out into nature and listen to and learn good music and do great art. They also need to be exposed to kids who are very different from them so they don’t grow up thinking everybody is like them.

Disagree? Say why in the comments below.

read more
Fashion(AA)

New York State Votes to Shorten Common Core Testing Days

iStock-517687808-300×232-059d7a977b457d6a012e7221ab2a1831fb183a2d

It’s been announced that the Common Core exams in New York state will be shortened by two days, making the exams comprise four days of testing instead of six.

(Image: iStock/smartboy10)

 

That’s according to News12 Westchester, which says the move will take effect next spring after education officials in the state voted to reduce the number of days set aside for testing.

Beginning of the End?

 

The tests, which have been euphemistically described as “unpopular,”—despised and detested might be more accurate—were also modified last year in New York in response to angry opposition from parents on the left and the right.

It’s been reported that about 20% of families boycotted the tests in recent years.

It really makes you wonder if Common Core is slowly being phased out. Or maybe just the name will change and people will feel much better about it—the way some states avoided using the words “Affordable Care Act” and named President Obama’s signature healthcare law something else, thereby making it more palatable for their constituents (and beneficiaries of the law).

“Next month Common Core will be re-dubbed the Next Generation Learning Standards,” News12 Westchester reports. Clearly the words “Common Core” have become too radioactive to retain.

What’s Wrong with the Common Core?

 

A lot of the reaction to the Common Core is irrational. All states already had standards—all of which were too low (except maybe those of Massachusetts, which has the best schools in the nation).

Just about all K-12 international students who come to study in the U.S. find the work much easier than in their home country. A sixth-grade Japanese boy who had studied in the U.S. and then returned to Japan is quoted in the front matter of the new book by Cornelius N. Grove, The Drive to Learn, as saying: “[In America], you really didn’t have to really, really do it.”

I’m for high expectations of all kids, coupled with abundant academic support within a context of social-emotional learning. I’m for seeing troubled kids as #SadNotBad, but also for holding those kids to high academic standards—since education is the one nearly guaranteed route out of poverty with all its attendant problems. And I’m for providing more funding and resources, not less, to high-poverty schools, which tend to have more troubled kids—often because of the stresses the kids are exposed to at home.

Of course, kids need lots of reading, lots of math, lots of project-based learning, and inquiry-based science. They need to get out into nature and listen to and learn good music and do great art. They also need to be exposed to kids who are very different from them so they don’t grow up thinking everybody is like them.

Disagree? Say why in the comments below.

read more
Fashion(AA)

New York State Votes to Shorten Common Core Testing Days

iStock-517687808-300×232-059d7a977b457d6a012e7221ab2a1831fb183a2d

It’s been announced that the Common Core exams in New York state will be shortened by two days, making the exams comprise four days of testing instead of six.

(Image: iStock/smartboy10)

 

That’s according to News12 Westchester, which says the move will take effect next spring after education officials in the state voted to reduce the number of days set aside for testing.

Beginning of the End?

 

The tests, which have been euphemistically described as “unpopular,”—despised and detested might be more accurate—were also modified last year in New York in response to angry opposition from parents on the left and the right.

It’s been reported that about 20% of families boycotted the tests in recent years.

It really makes you wonder if Common Core is slowly being phased out. Or maybe just the name will change and people will feel much better about it—the way some states avoided using the words “Affordable Care Act” and named President Obama’s signature healthcare law something else, thereby making it more palatable for their constituents (and beneficiaries of the law).

“Next month Common Core will be re-dubbed the Next Generation Learning Standards,” News12 Westchester reports. Clearly the words “Common Core” have become too radioactive to retain.

What’s Wrong with the Common Core?

 

A lot of the reaction to the Common Core is irrational. All states already had standards—all of which were too low (except maybe those of Massachusetts, which has the best schools in the nation).

Just about all K-12 international students who come to study in the U.S. find the work much easier than in their home country. A sixth-grade Japanese boy who had studied in the U.S. and then returned to Japan is quoted in the front matter of the new book by Cornelius N. Grove, The Drive to Learn, as saying: “[In America], you really didn’t have to really, really do it.”

I’m for high expectations of all kids, coupled with abundant academic support within a context of social-emotional learning. I’m for seeing troubled kids as #SadNotBad, but also for holding those kids to high academic standards—since education is the one nearly guaranteed route out of poverty with all its attendant problems. And I’m for providing more funding and resources, not less, to high-poverty schools, which tend to have more troubled kids—often because of the stresses the kids are exposed to at home.

Of course, kids need lots of reading, lots of math, lots of project-based learning, and inquiry-based science. They need to get out into nature and listen to and learn good music and do great art. They also need to be exposed to kids who are very different from them so they don’t grow up thinking everybody is like them.

Disagree? Say why in the comments below.

read more